Seeking socrates

Thảo luận trong 'Hỏi - Đáp Tiếng Anh THPT' bắt đầu bởi Tư Âm Diệp Ẩn, 24 Tháng bảy 2021.

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  1. Tư Âm Diệp Ẩn

    Tư Âm Diệp Ẩn Học sinh tiến bộ Thành viên HV CLB Hội họa Hội viên CLB Ngôn từ

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    Sở hữu bí kíp ĐỖ ĐẠI HỌC ít nhất 24đ - Đặt chỗ ngay!

    [TẶNG BẠN] TRỌN BỘ Bí kíp học tốt sáu môn học.


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    . The passage below consists of five paragraphs marked A, B, C, D and E. For questions 41-50, read the passage and do the task that follows. Write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided. Each letter may be used more than once.

    SEEKING SOCRATES

    It may be more than 2,400 years since his death, but the Greek philosopher can still teach us a thing or two about leading ‘the good life’. Bettany Hughes digs deeper.
    A Sharing breakfast with an award-winning author in an Edinburgh hotel a few years back, the conversation came round to what I was writing next. 'A book on Socrates,' I mumbled through my muesli. 'Socrates!' he exclaimed. 'What a brilliant doughnut subject. Really rich and succulent with a great hole in the middle where the central character should be.' I felt my smile fade because, of course, he was right. Socrates, the Greek philosopher, might be one of the most famous thinkers of all time, but, as far as we know, he wrote not a single word down. Born in Athens in 469BC, condemned to death by a democratic Athenian court in 399BC, Socrates philosophized freely for close on half a century. Then he was found guilty of corrupting the young and of disrespecting the city's traditional gods. His punishment? Lethal hemlock poison in a small prison cell. We don't have Socrates' personal archive; and we don't even know where he was buried. So, for many, he has come to seem aloof and nebulous – a daunting intellectual figure – always just out of reach.
    B But that is a crying shame. Put simply, we think the way we do because Socrates thought the way he did. His famous aphorism, 'the unexamined life is not worth living', is a central tenet for modern times. His philosophies 24 centuries old - are also remarkably relevant today. Socrates was acutely aware of the dangers of excess and overindulgence. He berated his peers for a selfish pursuit of material gain. He questioned the value of going to fight under an ideological banner of 'democracy'. What is the point of city walls, warships and glittering statues, he asked, if we are not happy? The pursuit of happiness is one of the political pillars of the West. We are entering what has been described as 'an age of empathy'. So Socrates' forensic, practical investigation of how to lead 'the good life' is more illuminating, more necessary than ever.
    C Rather than being some kind of remote, tunic-clad beardy who wandered around classical columns, Socrates was a man of the streets. The philosopher tore through Athens like a tornado, drinking, partying, sweating in the gym as hard as, if not harder than the next man. For him, philosophy was essential to human life. His mission: to find the best way to live on earth. As Cicero, the Roman author, perceptively put it: 'Socrates brought philosophy down from the skies.' And so to try to put him back on to the streets he loved and where his philosophy belonged, I have spent 10 years investigating the eastern Mediterranean landscape to find clues of his life and the 'Golden Age of Athens'. Using the latest archaeology, newly discovered historical sources, and the accounts of his key followers, Plato and Xenophon, I have endeavoured to create a Socrates shaped space, in the glittering city of 500BC Athens – ready for the philosopher to inhabit.
    D The street jargon used to describe the Athens of Socrates' day gives us a sense of its character. His hometown was known as 'sleek', 'oily', 'violet crowned', 'busybody' Athens. Lead curse tablets left in drains, scribbled down by those in the world's first true democracy, show that however progressive fifth-century Athenians were, their radical political experiment - allowing the demos (the people) to have kratos (power) did not do away with personal rivalries and grudges. Far from it. In fact, in the city where every full citizen was a potent politician, backbiting and cliquery came to take on epic proportions. By the time of his death, Socrates was caught up in this crossfire.
    E His life story is a reminder that the word 'democracy' is not a magic wand. It does not automatically vaporize all ills. This was Socrates' beef, too – a society can only be good not because of the powerful words it bandies around, but thanks to the moral backbone of each and every individual within it. But Athenians became greedy, they overreached themselves, and lived to see their city walls torn down by their Spartan enemies, and their radical democracy democratically voted out of existence. The city state needed someone to blame. High-profile, maddening, eccentric, freethinking, free-speaking Socrates was a good target. Socrates seems to me to be democracy's scapegoat. He was condemned because, in fragile times, anxious political masses want certainties – not the eternal questions that Socrates asked of the world around him.

    In which paragraph is each of the following mentioned? Your answers:
    relationships between people in Socrates' time 41.____
    the continuing importance of Socrates' beliefs 42.______
    the writer's theory concerning what happened to Socrates 43.___
    why little is known about Socrates as a man 44.___
    how the writer set about getting information relevant to Socrates 45.____
    the difference between common perceptions of Socrates and what he was really like 46.____
    an aim that Socrates was critical of 47.___
    the realization that finding out about Socrates was a difficult task 48.____
    how well known Socrates was during his time 49._____
    an issue that Socrates considered in great detail 50.____

    Mọi người giúp em bài này với . Bài khó quá mà em không biết làm:>(.
     
    Nguyễn Linh_2006Diệp Hạ Bạch thích bài này.
  2. An.hana07

    An.hana07 Học sinh Thành viên

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    41. D
    42. B
    43. E
    44. A
    45. C
    46. C
    47. B
    48. C
    49. E
    50. B
    Chúc bạn học tốt!
     
    Nguyễn Linh_2006, Trinh Linh MaiÁnh 01 thích bài này.
  3. Tư Âm Diệp Ẩn

    Tư Âm Diệp Ẩn Học sinh tiến bộ Thành viên HV CLB Hội họa Hội viên CLB Ngôn từ

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    bạn có thể giải thích giúp mình không ạ. Mình yếu dạng bài này lắm mà không biết cải thiện như thế nào:>(:>(
     
  4. An.hana07

    An.hana07 Học sinh Thành viên

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    Ở dạng bài này thì mình chủ yếu là tìm từ đồng nghĩa, giữa các đoạn văn và câu đề, xác định ngữ cảnh,.. ý bạn.
    Mình thử lấy vd ở câu 46 cho dễ hiểu:
    -Lúc đầu mình sẽ đọc lướt qua đoạn văn, sau đó mình sẽ đọc câu đề (đồng thời gạch chân các keywords để dễ xác định về các từ đồng nghĩa hơn) và thấy nó nghiêng về đoạn nào hơn thì mình sẽ tìm và đọc lại đoạn đó thật kỹ.
    -Ở đây, mình thấy nó nghiêng về đoạn C hơn thì mình sẽ bắt đầu đọc kỹ nó sau đó tìm từ đồng nghĩa với các keywords đã được gạch chân ở câu hỏi.
    46. The difference between common perceptions of Socrates and what he was really like
    Có thể thấy ngay câu đầu ở đoạn C: Rather than being some kind of remote, tunic-clad beardy who wandered around classical columns, Socrates was a man of the streets.
    -Có cụm từ rather than, và khi nói đến rather than (nghĩa: thay vì) thì chắc chắn sẽ có sự đối lập ở đây => rather than này cũng tương đương với the difference
    Common perceptinos:
    ( bỏ qua chữ perceptions vì ta có thể ko biết, vậy thì hãy chú ý đến từ common (nghĩa: chung- từ này thì chắc ai cũng biết)
    -Ta có thể dịch thoáng qua câu văn: Rather than being some kind of remote, tunic-clad beardy who wandered around classical columns, Socrates was a man of the streets. ( Thay vì là một kiểu người...như thế nào đó, thì Socrates là một người đàn ông của đường phố)
    từ đó ta suy ra câu Rathe than being some kind of remote, tunic-clad beardy who wandered around classical columns, này chắc chắn nói về 1 cái gì đó chung chung, kiểu như là nhận thức chung của mọi người về người đàn ông này tương đương với cụm common perceptions.
    -
    Cũng từ câu văn ta vừa dịch trên, có thể suy ra rằng: cụm what he was really like tương đương với cụm Socrates was a man of the streets.
    Đó là vd mình thử làm cho bạn, nhìn có vẻ dài dòng, khó hiểu nhưng làm quen thì sẽ rút gọn được nhiều cái hơn.

    Mong là vd này sẽ giúp cho bạn hiểu thêm một phần nào đó.
    Chúc bạn học tốt!
     
    Last edited: 29 Tháng bảy 2021
    Tư Âm Diệp Ẩn, Ánh 01, Aww Pomme2 others thích bài này.
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